For the 2021 model year, the M5, and its more powerful sibling the M5 Competition, mirror the changes to the standard 5-series sedan with a few performance upgrades. Equipped with the S63 4.4-liter V-8, the standard M5 produces 600 horsepower, served up at 6000 rpm, while the M5 Competition gets an additional 17 horsepower increase and so much more.

 

Written By- Neehan Rashid  Pictures: BMW

When we think about four-door sedans with the abilities of a supercar, it wouldn’t be wrong to think about the M5 as the sensei of the category. Unveiled in the mid-1980s to show what a family hauling sedan could do, the original M5 shoehorned the legendary M1 engine into its regular E28 shell. This ingenious idea allowed the car to reach a top speed exceeding 150mph, in style. Now in the 20th century the legendary German sedan has entered the second half of its life cycle as the 6th gen M5.

For the 2021 model year, the M5, and its more powerful sibling the M5 Competition, mirror the changes to the standard 5-series sedan with a few performance upgrades. There is a new and larger 12.3-inch touchscreen display, the cloud-based navigation system works more efficiently, and the infotainment system now features Android Auto capability while also keeping Apple CarPlay functionality. Bringing in equality between both Apple and Android users.

Equipped with the S63 4.4-liter V-8, the standard M5 produces 600 horsepower, served up at 6000 rpm, while the M5 Competition gets an additional 17 horsepower increase. Maximum torque is identical at 553 lb-ft. In simpler words, the new M5 has some impressive performance figures. BMW claims that the standard M5’s sprint from zero to 60 mph takes 3.2 seconds, while the Competition version does it in 3.1 seconds. Talk about rivalry between the brothers. Top speed for both versions is controlled at 155 mph or an optional 190 mph. However, the remarkably low 0.31 drag coefficient for the Competition model would most likely allow the car to exceed 200 mph easily, only if the German Manufacturer would let it out of its leash.

The M5 and M5 Competition are still fitted with a mandatory eight-speed torque-converter-type automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is standard as well, but the driver has the option of disconnecting the front axle to achieve the classic RWD oversteering behavior. Which means they’ll be able to get sideways. However, BMW strongly encourages drivers to use this setting in a controlled environment only. Unique to the Competition version is a new Track mode, which disables not only all the driving assistance systems, but also the hi-fi system and the central information display.

In terms of appearance, the new head- and taillights along with the redesigned bumpers and not oversized sharp-edged front grilles, give the car a fighter jet vibe. With a nice colour combination that suites the body styling of the car, it would sure attract a lot of attention. Especially the red and black combination that screams wicked.

The 2021 M5 and M5 Competition are expected to be sold at a starting price of $104,495 for the standard model and $111,095 for the Competition. These prices are relatively close to the cost of the Audi RS7 and the Mercedes-AMG E63 S. But my soft spot for M5s make me believe that the German sensei is going to be hard to beat by his native rivals.